posted in Autofan Crash Tests section February 21, 2017

Video: 2017 BMW i3 side IIHS crash test

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The i3, a small car, fails to reach the winner's circle because it rates only acceptable in the head restraint and seat evaluation, which measures a vehicle's ability to protect against neck injuries in a rear crash. While such injuries are rarely fatal, they are the most common type of crash injury and can cause debilitating pain.

The i3 earns good ratings in the other crashworthiness tests and is available with an optional front crash prevention system that earns an advanced rating. The system reduced the impact speed by an average of 9 mph in the 12 mph track test and by 7 mph in the 25 mph test. Its warning component meets National Highway Traffic Safety Administration criteria. The i3's only available headlight system earns an acceptable rating.

BMW's electric car is a rear-wheel-drive, four-seat hatchback with rear-hinged back doors. Simplistic interior has similar lines as IKEA's design language. The electric motor produces the equivalent of 170 hp, which makes this car feel very nimble. Add-on two-cylinder engine, which acts as an onboard generator rather than a primary power source, extends the range beyond the typical 75 miles to about 130 miles total. Charge times are about 4 hours with a 240-volt connection.

Unfortunately in 2017 BMW i3 failed to score as high as other electric vehicles rated by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Received an "Acceptable" rating instead of "Good" rating like it's competitors by the IIHS.

Video: 2017 BMW i3 side IIHS crash test Video: 2017 BMW i3 side IIHS crash test Video: 2017 BMW i3 side IIHS crash test Video: 2017 BMW i3 side IIHS crash test Video: 2017 BMW i3 side IIHS crash test Video: 2017 BMW i3 side IIHS crash test

source: IIHS

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